AWP Off-site Reading Mar. 1

AWP Off-site Reading
Saturday Mar. 1, 2014 @ 6pm
The Project Room (1315 E. Pine Street, Seattle, Wa.)
with writers Gina Frangello, Pam Houston and Melinda Moustakis
A reading and discussion around our current topics “Transformation” and “Privacy,” featuring the work of three writers whose work overlaps in interesting ways.

http://www.projectroomseattle.org/programs-content/2014/2/confession-and-transformation-writers-gina-frangello-pam-houston-and-melinda-moustakis

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NEA and Kenyon Review Fellowship

Two recent happenings worthy of a note: I was awarded a 2014 National Endowment of the Arts Literature Fellowship in Fiction and I just found out I’ll be the 2014-2016 Kenyon Review Fellow in Fiction http://www.kenyonreview.org/programs/fellowship/

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O. Henry Event at Texas Book Festival

Excited to be part of this event at the Texas Book Festival this weekend in Austin:
10/26, Saturday: 4-5 PM, 2013 O. Henry Prize Reading
Capital Extension Room E2-030
Lily Tuck, Melinda Moustakis, Nalini Jones, Ayşe Papatya Bucak, and Joan Silber give short readings and discuss their work. Moderated by editor Laura Furman.

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2013 O. Henry Prize Stories Just Released

Quite a thrill to see my story “They Find the Drowned” in the 2013 O. Henry Prize stories. Just went to the bookstore to buy a copy.581598_580961408629707_769678546_n

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If You Lived Here: Interview Series at American Short Fiction

I’m very excited to be doing a blog series of author interviews for American Short Fiction. Here’s a link to the first with the fantastic Danielle Evans :

If You Lived Here: An Interview with Danielle Evans 

In “If You Lived Here,” a blog series of author interviews, some questions, not all, will focus on place, being displaced and the places in the story that “marry a hurt like that.” The hope is that these questions will lead to other places and other questions. The first interview is with Danielle Evans, author of the acclaimed short story collection Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self

Before-You-Suffocate-Your-Own-Fool-Self

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Flavorwire: The Ten Best Millennial Authors…

Got some love from Flavorwire! They just posted an article called The Ten Best Millennial Authors You Probably Haven’t Read (Yet). Look for me listed as number nine and here is the link: http://flavorwire.com/378617/the-10-best-millennial-authors-you-probably-havent-read-yet

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30 Days of the Flannery O’Connor Award: Day 16

http://ugapress.blogspot.com/2013/03/30-days-of-flannery-oconnor-award-day-16.html

Eric Shade, author of the FOC winner Eyesores, wrote a wonderful and insightful review of Bear Down, Bear North for the Flannery O’Connor Award 30th Anniversay blog series. Here is an excerpt:

Viewing a map of the United States, one may tend automatically to overlook the nation’s two geographical extremes—Hawaii, the honeymoon getaway—and, of course, Alaska, that great, sprawling immensity, more Canada than America, which seems to occupy at least a third if not more of the territory of the Continental United States. Melinda Moustakis’ book will no longer let map viewers let Alaska hide in the periphery of their vision.

What is additionally and fundamentally remarkable about the stories contained in the book is that the state’s major cities—Fairbanks, Anchorage, and Juneau—are themselves on the periphery. Most, if not all, of the action happens outdoors, or in ramshackle cabins, with the Kenai River as a frequent point of reference.

Most immediately demanding of our attention when reading Moustakis’ stories (and what has already deservedly been mentioned) is the striking imagery, particularly in “The Mannequin in Soldotna,” where the hospital staff decorates a mannequin with fishing hooks—hooks that have in fact been removed from patients and set into the mannequin, we imagine, as a warning to locals about the dangers of fishing—especially drunken fishing, fishing with amateurs, or fishing with folks where the relationship is strained.

There is more grotesque imagery, and plenty of brutality—both physical and emotional—but were Moustakis to rely merely on the unsavory and violent, the book would run the risk of seeming one-dimensional, even cruel to its own very charming characters. Instead, Moustakis tempers the freakish and frightening with, first, a generous supply of descriptions of the natural scenery; second, a fine-tuned, grim sense of humor; and third, a recurring, important theme regarding the complicated relationships between women, particularly mothers and daughters, in a land where the traditional gender roles are useless, in a land where women have to be as good—even better—than the men at providing basic sustenance for their families… (click here to read the rest on the UGA Press blog)

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